Education

Click on a Category Below to Go Directly to that Information or Simply Scroll Down to Learn More

Eye Diseases and Conditions
Vision Throughout Our Lifetime
How Often Should I Get My Eyes Checked?
InfantSEE® Program
Vision Correction Surgery
Other Useful Websites


Eye Diseases and Conditions


Information on the following eye diseases and conditions can be found by clicking on the links provided. This will take you to website of the Pennsylvania Optometric Association. Here, you will be able to read more information and, in many cases, watch a small video clip.
Back to Top

NOTE: Diseases or Conditions above with the icon have videos along with content.


Vision Throughout Our Lifetime

Each stage of life can bring with it changes to your vision. The following links will describe normal changes with your eyes, signs and symptoms of potential problems, and recommendations to keep your eyes healthy. Whether you're one or one hundred, this section provides valuable information.

Infant Vision – Birth to 24 Months

Preschool Vision – 2 to 5 years of age


School-aged Vision – 8 to 18 years of age

Pediatric-Vision-Checklist (Click Here to View Now)

Adult Vision – 19 to 40 years of age


Adult Vision – 41 to 60 years of age

Adult Vision – Over 60 years of age


Back to Top



How Often Should I Get My Eyes Checked?


It is important to have your eyes examined on a regular basis, even if you think that you "see just fine." Many eye diseases do not have symptoms in their early stages, but can be detected during a thorough eye exam. At Greater Vision Eye Associates, LLC, we recommend the following guidelines:

• First exam between the ages of 6 and 12 months (refer to the InfantSEE program below)
• At 3 years of age
• At 5 years of age
• Every year while a student
• Every 2 years until the age of 60
• Every year after the age of 60

Many patients need to be seen on a more regular basis. This includes diabetics (yearly), contact lens wearers (at least yearly), individuals who use certain medications and people with diagnosed eye diseases. Your doctor will determine the most appropriate schedule for you. Back to Top


InfantSEE® Program


Because vision plays a major role in infant development, it is never too early to start thinking about your baby's eye health. To help stress the importance of children's vision, a nationwide program called InfantSEE® was started several years ago. This program provides a free, comprehensive eye assessment to children under the age of one year. We recommend that this be done between the ages of 6 and 12 months, unless there are concerns before that time.

We have seen many little ones in our office under the InfantSEE® program. While most of these children had perfectly healthy eyes, some had conditions that, if left untreated, could have resulted in permanent visual impairment. These children were otherwise healthy and saw their pediatricians regularly.

An InfantSEE® eye assessment is not a substitute for the well infant care that your baby receives at the pediatrician's office; however, it is something that we feel should be a part of the infant wellness routine. Significant risk factors to eye and vision disorders are often not detectable by basic infant eye screenings.

Please contact our office for more information or to schedule an InfantSEE® appointment. You may also read more information by clicking here. Back to Top


Vision Correction Surgery


Many people are interested in surgery to decrease their dependence on glasses or contacts. Today, there are many options available, including LASIK, custom LASIK, PRK, refractive lens exchange and others. We encourage our patients to talk with us about which option we would recommend for their eyes. To read more about the various options for vision correct surgery, please click here. Back to Top


Other Useful Websites


All About Vision www.allaboutvision.com
American Optometric Association
www.aoa.org
InfantSee Program
www.infantsee.org
Low Vision Resources
www.lowvision.com
National Eye Institute
www.nei.nih.gov

Back to Top